For Beginners Only - 2

26 October 2014

SIG: Travel

Learning and understanding the basics of how to set up the camera yourself actually takes you a long way towards improving your photography technique and therefore taking better photographs.

 

If you first started taking pictures fairly recently you probably learned your photography technique with a modern camera.

This gave you tremendous advantages because all you had to do was switch it on, point the camera at your subject and press the shutter button to record your image.

You didn’t have to worry about all the settings that the camera made for you automatically or, if you were offered a choice of settings, there was an “auto” or “program” setting that you selected.

Had your interest in photography begun a little earlier, before automatic cameras were available, you would have had a bit more to learn before you could grab those pictures.

How boring. Or was it?

Learning and understanding the basics of how to set up the camera yourself actually takes you a long way towards improving your photography technique and therefore taking better photographs.

So what are the basics?

Whenever you prepare to take a photograph there are four important things to remember -

1 - Composition (What is in the picture and where it is)

2 - Lighting (What's in the light and what’s in the shade)

3 - Exposure (The amount of light “seen” by the camera)

4 - Focus (What is sharp and what isn’t)

CLEF - Easy to remember, even if you are not a musician!

Right. All set up. Batteries charged and camera switched on? Nearly ready, but one final thought .....

Who will be viewing your picture?

This may not seem important but it is always worth remembering when you take a photograph. The reason is that you will have experienced the actual scene and your photograph will trigger the memory of it when you view it in the future. It will give you a feeling.

When someone else who was not at the actual scene views your photograph, they will want it to communicate a feeling to them, even if it is different from yours.

Try to bear this in mind whenever you take a photograph.

This article is an extract from the original which goes into more detail about the four parts of CLEF.


Previous Articles in the series -

1 - "Photography Technique - Holding the Camera"